Out of the bag -plenty of bang for your buck!

For those of you reading this who has visited my clinic, you will be familiar with the smell of the smoke and experience of a good body (and mind) awakening moxa treatment.

People who first enter my clinic sometimes comment that they think I may smoke pot between my patients! I had one Dutch fellow a while back who was somewhat nervous on his first visit. He told me later that he thought I was smoking pot and was very worried about my needling skills! I thought this was rather amusing and in response I have placed a notice in my clinic reception in Dutch explaining the ins- and -outs of moxa and how it can sometimes be confused with the smell in an Amsterdam coffee house- apparently a Dutch cultural thing. I do of course offer the Dutch reader the opportunity to purchase a bag of high quality Japanese Artemisia which they are welcome to smoke at home with friends and family. As an Englishman, I am sure too  that the Dutch have bestowed a few cultural traits on us!

I have been using moxa for many years in my practice. Most commonly I use moxa directly on the skin, removing it just when it starts to get hot. Either my attending students or I meticulously roll the cones by hand. It’s a task that at first sight seems very simple for the observer yet in practice is quite difficult as each cone needs to be exactly the same size, density shape and form as each other so that they burn precisely and can be taken off in sequence as quickly as possible. Moxa used this way is very effective. I have looked at a few videos on YouTube and have seen this done very badly -even taught by ‘teachers’ who basically instruct acupuncture students to make bad cones which clearly are unsymmetrical and different sizes. Actually, this isn’t the point, any cone is good and indeed moxa can be used at home by patients alike – but as a professional then it should be done better than someone who uses it at home as a remedial therapy or occasionally use it in clinic.

One of the things I like about moxa is its ability to wake up the immune and defensive mechanism. In this modern age our bodies are far less active -more sedentary and less involved in a sudden stated of emergency.

Trauma* as a therapy.

As a patient you may have this image of an oriental fellow with a white beard burning a magic herb on your body (it’s a nice image) but in reality your body actually thinks its getting burned. In response to this “burn” the body rallies its defensive mechanism to the area where the moxa is being done as a kind of controlled micro trauma. As the moxa is placed on an acupuncture point related to a particular meridian- is close to an area where there is a vital organ or where there is a trauma- or has been a trauma** -then the qi and blood related to that organ is also liberated systemically and locally. This simple precise treatment  is actually doing a number of good things simultaneously. For a practitioner, is very good for keeping the hands and fingers strong, so we all benefit! Also, the effects of moxa last up to 6 months and in this sense, you certainly do get good “bang for your buck”. Because its done directly on the skin, the oils of the moxa are absorbed into the body . Even on children it’s very good. Recently I was told by a mother of two children here that since coming to my clinic they haven’t needed any antibiotics at all, and can shift colds and flu using their own defensive mechanism.

Various studies I have read reveal that moxa used directly this way makes new red and white blood cells, regulates liver function and blood sugar- reduces blood pressure and is anti carcinogenic (to name a few basic benefits- even the smoke from moxa is good!). With this in mind, we can see that it’s very beneficial for the immune defensive system as well as a general health maintenance treatment.

*GBH= Grievous Bodily Harm. This is a term that the police use for physical assault.Please don’t confuse a good acupuncture and moxa treatment!However, it makes interesting food for thought!

** I recently treated a patient who had an operation in the UK and his scar was healing badly. During surgery the bodies defensive mechanism is shut down which can make healing slow. One moxa treatment liberated a dormant healing response – the scar began to heal the following day. You can read more details in the post Case Studies 2013

For those of you reading this who has visited my clinic, you will be familiar with the smell of the smoke and experience of a good body (and mind) awakening moxa treatment.

People who first enter my clinic sometimes comment that they think I may smoke pot between my patients. I had one Dutch fellow a while back who was somewhat nervous in his first visit. He told me later that he thought I was smoking pot and was very worried about my needling skills. I thought this was rather amusing and in response I have placed a notice in my clinic reception in Dutch explaining the ins and outs of moxa and how is can sometimes be confused with the smell in an Amsterdam coffee house- apparently a Dutch cultural thing. I do of course offer the Dutch reader the opportunity to purchase a bag of high quality Japanese Artemisia which they are welcome to smoke at home with friends and family. As an Englishman, I am sure too  that the Dutch have bestowed a few cultural traits on us!

I have been using moxa for many years in my practice. Most commonly I use moxa directly on the skin, removing it just when it starts to get hot. Either my attending students or I meticulously roll the cones by hand. It’s a task that at first sight seems very simple for the observer yet in practice is quite difficult as each cone needs to be exactly the same size, density shape and form as each other so that they burn precisely and can be taken off in sequence as quickly as possible. Moxa used this way is very effective. I have looked at a few videos on YouTube and have seen this done very badly -even taught by ‘teachers’ who basically instruct acupuncture students to make bad cones. Actually, this isn’t the point, any cone is good but as a professional then it should be done better than someone who uses it at home as a remedial therapy or occasionally use it in clinic.

One of the things I like about moxa is its ability to wake up the immune and defensive mechanism. In this modern age our bodies are far less active -more sedentary and less involved in a sudden stated of emergency.

Trauma* as a therapy.

As a patient you may have this image of an oriental fellow with a white beard burning a magic herb on your body (it’s a nice image) but in reality your body actually thinks its getting burned. In response to this “burn” the body rallies its defensive mechanism to the area where the moxa is being done as a kind of controlled micro trauma. As the moxa is placed on an acupuncture point related to a particular meridian- is close to an area where there is a vital organ or where there is a trauma- or has been a trauma** -then the qi and blood related to that organ is also liberated systemically and locally. This simple precise treatment  is actually doing a number of good things simultaneously. For a practitioner, is very good for keeping the hands and fingers strong, so we all benefit! Also, the effects of moxa last up to 6 months and in this sense, you certainly do get good “bang for your buck”. Because its done directly on the skin, the oils of the moxa are absorbed into the body . Even on children it’s very good. Recently I was told by a mother of two children here that since coming to my clinic they haven’t needed any antibiotics at all, and can shift colds and flu using their own defensive mechanism.

Various studies I have read reveal that moxa used directly this way makes new red and white blood cells, regulates liver function and blood sugar- reduces blood pressure and is anti carcinogenic (to name a few basic benefits- even the smoke from moxa is good!). With this in mind, we can see that it’s very beneficial for the immune defensive system as well as a general health maintenance treatment.

*GBH= Grievous Bodily Harm. This is a term that the police use for physical assault.Please don’t confuse a good acupuncture and moxa treatment!However, it makes interesting food for thought!

** I recently treated a patient who had an operation in the UK and his scar was healing badly. During surgery the bodies defensive mechanism is shut down which can make healing slow. One moxa treatment liberated a dormant healing response – the scar began to heal the following day. You can read more details in the post “Currently treating 2013”

For those of you reading this who has visited my clinic, you will be familiar with the smell of the smoke and experience of a good body (and mind) awakening moxa treatment.

People who first enter my clinic sometimes comment that they think I may smoke pot between my patients. I had one Dutch fellow a while back who was somewhat nervous in his first visit. He told me later that he thought I was smoking pot and was very worried about my needling skills. I thought this was rather amusing and in response I have placed a notice in my clinic reception in Dutch explaining the ins and outs of moxa and how is can sometimes be confused with the smell in an Amsterdam coffee house- apparently a Dutch cultural thing. I do of course offer the Dutch reader the opportunity to purchase a bag of high quality Japanese Artemisia which they are welcome to smoke at home with friends and family. As an Englishman, I am sure too  that the Dutch have bestowed a few cultural traits on us!

I have been using moxa for many years in my practice. Most commonly I use moxa directly on the skin, removing it just when it starts to get hot. Either my attending students or I meticulously roll the cones by hand. It’s a task that at first sight seems very simple for the observer yet in practice is quite difficult as each cone needs to be exactly the same size, density shape and form as each other so that they burn precisely and can be taken off in sequence as quickly as possible. Moxa used this way is very effective. I have looked at a few videos on YouTube and have seen this done very badly -even taught by ‘teachers’ who basically instruct acupuncture students to make bad cones. Actually, this isn’t the point, any cone is good but as a professional then it should be done better than someone who uses it at home as a remedial therapy or occasionally use it in clinic.

One of the things I like about moxa is its ability to wake up the immune and defensive mechanism. In this modern age our bodies are far less active -more sedentary and less involved in a sudden stated of emergency.

Trauma* as a therapy.

As a patient you may have this image of an oriental fellow with a white beard burning a magic herb on your body (it’s a nice image) but in reality your body actually thinks its getting burned. In response to this “burn” the body rallies its defensive mechanism to the area where the moxa is being done as a kind of controlled micro trauma. As the moxa is placed on an acupuncture point related to a particular meridian- is close to an area where there is a vital organ or where there is a trauma- or has been a trauma** -then the qi and blood related to that organ is also liberated systemically and locally. This simple precise treatment  is actually doing a number of good things simultaneously. For a practitioner, is very good for keeping the hands and fingers strong, so we all benefit! Also, the effects of moxa last up to 6 months and in this sense, you certainly do get good “bang for your buck”. Because its done directly on the skin, the oils of the moxa are absorbed into the body . Even on children it’s very good. Recently I was told by a mother of two children here that since coming to my clinic they haven’t needed any antibiotics at all, and can shift colds and flu using their own defensive mechanism.

Various studies I have read reveal that moxa used directly this way makes new red and white blood cells, regulates liver function and blood sugar- reduces blood pressure and is anti carcinogenic (to name a few basic benefits- even the smoke from moxa is good!). With this in mind, we can see that it’s very beneficial for the immune defensive system as well as a general health maintenance treatment.

*GBH= Grievous Bodily Harm. This is a term that the police use for physical assault.Please don’t confuse a good acupuncture and moxa treatment!However, it makes interesting food for thought!

** I recently treated a patient who had an operation in the UK and his scar was healing badly. During surgery the bodies defensive mechanism is shut down which can make healing slow. One moxa treatment liberated a dormant healing response – the scar began to heal the following day. You can read more details in the post “Currently treating 2013”

 

 

For those of you reading this who has visited my clinic, you will be familiar with the smell of the smoke and experience of a good body (and mind) awakening moxa treatment.

People who first enter my clinic sometimes comment that they think I may smoke pot between my patients. I had one Dutch fellow a while back who was somewhat nervous in his first visit. He told me later that he thought I was smoking pot and was very worried about my needling skills. I thought this was rather amusing and in response I have placed a notice in my clinic reception in Dutch explaining the ins and outs of moxa and how is can sometimes be confused with the smell in an Amsterdam coffee house- apparently a Dutch cultural thing. I do of course offer the Dutch reader the opportunity to purchase a bag of high quality Japanese Artemisia which they are welcome to smoke at home with friends and family. As an Englishman, I am sure too  that the Dutch have bestowed a few cultural traits on us!

I have been using moxa for many years in my practice. Most commonly I use moxa directly on the skin, removing it just when it starts to get hot. Either my attending students or I meticulously roll the cones by hand. It’s a task that at first sight seems very simple for the observer yet in practice is quite difficult as each cone needs to be exactly the same size, density shape and form as each other so that they burn precisely and can be taken off in sequence as quickly as possible. Moxa used this way is very effective. I have looked at a few videos on YouTube and have seen this done very badly -even taught by ‘teachers’ who basically instruct acupuncture students to make bad cones. Actually, this isn’t the point, any cone is good but as a professional then it should be done better than someone who uses it at home as a remedial therapy or occasionally use it in clinic.

One of the things I like about moxa is its ability to wake up the immune and defensive mechanism. In this modern age our bodies are far less active -more sedentary and less involved in a sudden stated of emergency.

Trauma* as a therapy.

As a patient you may have this image of an oriental fellow with a white beard burning a magic herb on your body (it’s a nice image) but in reality your body actually thinks its getting burned. In response to this “burn” the body rallies its defensive mechanism to the area where the moxa is being done as a kind of controlled micro trauma. As the moxa is placed on an acupuncture point related to a particular meridian- is close to an area where there is a vital organ or where there is a trauma- or has been a trauma** -then the qi and blood related to that organ is also liberated systemically and locally. This simple precise treatment  is actually doing a number of good things simultaneously. For a practitioner, is very good for keeping the hands and fingers strong, so we all benefit! Also, the effects of moxa last up to 6 months and in this sense, you certainly do get good “bang for your buck”. Because its done directly on the skin, the oils of the moxa are absorbed into the body . Even on children it’s very good. Recently I was told by a mother of two children here that since coming to my clinic they haven’t needed any antibiotics at all, and can shift colds and flu using their own defensive mechanism.

Various studies I have read reveal that moxa used directly this way makes new red and white blood cells, regulates liver function and blood sugar- reduces blood pressure and is anti carcinogenic (to name a few basic benefits- even the smoke from moxa is good!). With this in mind, we can see that it’s very beneficial for the immune defensive system as well as a general health maintenance treatment.

*GBH= Grievous Bodily Harm. This is a term that the police use for physical assault.Please don’t confuse a good acupuncture and moxa treatment!However, it makes interesting food for thought!

** I recently treated a patient who had an operation in the UK and his scar was healing badly. During surgery the bodies defensive mechanism is shut down which can make healing slow. One moxa treatment liberated a dormant healing response – the scar began to heal the following day. You can read more details in the post “Currently treating 2013”

For those of you reading this who has visited my clinic, you will be familiar with the smell of the smoke and experience of a good body (and mind) awakening moxa treatment.

People who first enter my clinic sometimes comment that they think I may smoke pot between my patients. I had one Dutch fellow a while back who was somewhat nervous in his first visit. He told me later that he thought I was smoking pot and was very worried about my needling skills. I thought this was rather amusing and in response I have placed a notice in my clinic reception in Dutch explaining the ins and outs of moxa and how is can sometimes be confused with the smell in an Amsterdam coffee house- apparently a Dutch cultural thing. I do of course offer the Dutch reader the opportunity to purchase a bag of high quality Japanese Artemisia which they are welcome to smoke at home with friends and family. As an Englishman, I am sure too  that the Dutch have bestowed a few cultural traits on us!

I have been using moxa for many years in my practice. Most commonly I use moxa directly on the skin, removing it just when it starts to get hot. Either my attending students or I meticulously roll the cones by hand. It’s a task that at first sight seems very simple for the observer yet in practice is quite difficult as each cone needs to be exactly the same size, density shape and form as each other so that they burn precisely and can be taken off in sequence as quickly as possible. Moxa used this way is very effective. I have looked at a few videos on YouTube and have seen this done very badly -even taught by ‘teachers’ who basically instruct acupuncture students to make bad cones. Actually, this isn’t the point, any cone is good but as a professional then it should be done better than someone who uses it at home as a remedial therapy or occasionally use it in clinic.

One of the things I like about moxa is its ability to wake up the immune and defensive mechanism. In this modern age our bodies are far less active -more sedentary and less involved in a sudden stated of emergency.

Trauma* as a therapy.

As a patient you may have this image of an oriental fellow with a white beard burning a magic herb on your body (it’s a nice image) but in reality your body actually thinks its getting burned. In response to this “burn” the body rallies its defensive mechanism to the area where the moxa is being done as a kind of controlled micro trauma. As the moxa is placed on an acupuncture point related to a particular meridian- is close to an area where there is a vital organ or where there is a trauma- or has been a trauma** -then the qi and blood related to that organ is also liberated systemically and locally. This simple precise treatment  is actually doing a number of good things simultaneously. For a practitioner, is very good for keeping the hands and fingers strong, so we all benefit! Also, the effects of moxa last up to 6 months and in this sense, you certainly do get good “bang for your buck”. Because its done directly on the skin, the oils of the moxa are absorbed into the body . Even on children it’s very good. Recently I was told by a mother of two children here that since coming to my clinic they haven’t needed any antibiotics at all, and can shift colds and flu using their own defensive mechanism.

Various studies I have read reveal that moxa used directly this way makes new red and white blood cells, regulates liver function and blood sugar- reduces blood pressure and is anti carcinogenic (to name a few basic benefits- even the smoke from moxa is good!). With this in mind, we can see that it’s very beneficial for the immune defensive system as well as a general health maintenance treatment.

*GBH= Grievous Bodily Harm. This is a term that the police use for physical assault.Please don’t confuse a good acupuncture and moxa treatment!However, it makes interesting food for thought!

** I recently treated a patient who had an operation in the UK and his scar was healing badly. During surgery the bodies defensive mechanism is shut down which can make healing slow. One moxa treatment liberated a dormant healing response – the scar began to heal the following day. You can read more details in the post “Currently treating 2013”

For those of you reading this who has visited my clinic, you will be familiar with the smell of the smoke and experience of a good body (and mind) awakening moxa treatment.

People who first enter my clinic sometimes comment that they think I may smoke pot between my patients. I had one Dutch fellow a while back who was somewhat nervous in his first visit. He told me later that he thought I was smoking pot and was very worried about my needling skills. I thought this was rather amusing and in response I have placed a notice in my clinic reception in Dutch explaining the ins and outs of moxa and how is can sometimes be confused with the smell in an Amsterdam coffee house- apparently a Dutch cultural thing. I do of course offer the Dutch reader the opportunity to purchase a bag of high quality Japanese Artemisia which they are welcome to smoke at home with friends and family. As an Englishman, I am sure too  that the Dutch have bestowed a few cultural traits on us!

I have been using moxa for many years in my practice. Most commonly I use moxa directly on the skin, removing it just when it starts to get hot. Either my attending students or I meticulously roll the cones by hand. It’s a task that at first sight seems very simple for the observer yet in practice is quite difficult as each cone needs to be exactly the same size, density shape and form as each other so that they burn precisely and can be taken off in sequence as quickly as possible. Moxa used this way is very effective. I have looked at a few videos on YouTube and have seen this done very badly -even taught by ‘teachers’ who basically instruct acupuncture students to make bad cones. Actually, this isn’t the point, any cone is good but as a professional then it should be done better than someone who uses it at home as a remedial therapy or occasionally use it in clinic.

One of the things I like about moxa is its ability to wake up the immune and defensive mechanism. In this modern age our bodies are far less active -more sedentary and less involved in a sudden stated of emergency.

Trauma* as a therapy.

As a patient you may have this image of an oriental fellow with a white beard burning a magic herb on your body (it’s a nice image) but in reality your body actually thinks its getting burned. In response to this “burn” the body rallies its defensive mechanism to the area where the moxa is being done as a kind of controlled micro trauma. As the moxa is placed on an acupuncture point related to a particular meridian- is close to an area where there is a vital organ or where there is a trauma- or has been a trauma** -then the qi and blood related to that organ is also liberated systemically and locally. This simple precise treatment  is actually doing a number of good things simultaneously. For a practitioner, is very good for keeping the hands and fingers strong, so we all benefit! Also, the effects of moxa last up to 6 months and in this sense, you certainly do get good “bang for your buck”. Because its done directly on the skin, the oils of the moxa are absorbed into the body . Even on children it’s very good. Recently I was told by a mother of two children here that since coming to my clinic they haven’t needed any antibiotics at all, and can shift colds and flu using their own defensive mechanism.

Various studies I have read reveal that moxa used directly this way makes new red and white blood cells, regulates liver function and blood sugar- reduces blood pressure and is anti carcinogenic (to name a few basic benefits- even the smoke from moxa is good!). With this in mind, we can see that it’s very beneficial for the immune defensive system as well as a general health maintenance treatment.

*GBH= Grievous Bodily Harm. This is a term that the police use for physical assault.Please don’t confuse a good acupuncture and moxa treatment!However, it makes interesting food for thought!

** I recently treated a patient who had an operation in the UK and his scar was healing badly. During surgery the bodies defensive mechanism is shut down which can make healing slow. One moxa treatment liberated a dormant healing response – the scar began to heal the following day. You can read more details in the post “Currently treating 2013”

 

 

For those of you reading this who has visited my clinic, you will be familiar with the smell of the smoke and experience of a good body (and mind) awakening moxa treatment.

People who first enter my clinic sometimes comment that they think I may smoke pot between my patients. I had one Dutch fellow a while back who was somewhat nervous in his first visit. He told me later that he thought I was smoking pot and was very worried about my needling skills. I thought this was rather amusing and in response I have placed a notice in my clinic reception in Dutch explaining the ins and outs of moxa and how is can sometimes be confused with the smell in an Amsterdam coffee house- apparently a Dutch cultural thing. I do of course offer the Dutch reader the opportunity to purchase a bag of high quality Japanese Artemisia which they are welcome to smoke at home with friends and family. As an Englishman, I am sure too  that the Dutch have bestowed a few cultural traits on us!

I have been using moxa for many years in my practice. Most commonly I use moxa directly on the skin, removing it just when it starts to get hot. Either my attending students or I meticulously roll the cones by hand. It’s a task that at first sight seems very simple for the observer yet in practice is quite difficult as each cone needs to be exactly the same size, density shape and form as each other so that they burn precisely and can be taken off in sequence as quickly as possible. Moxa used this way is very effective. I have looked at a few videos on YouTube and have seen this done very badly -even taught by ‘teachers’ who basically instruct acupuncture students to make bad cones. Actually, this isn’t the point, any cone is good but as a professional then it should be done better than someone who uses it at home as a remedial therapy or occasionally use it in clinic.

One of the things I like about moxa is its ability to wake up the immune and defensive mechanism. In this modern age our bodies are far less active -more sedentary and less involved in a sudden stated of emergency.

Trauma* as a therapy.

As a patient you may have this image of an oriental fellow with a white beard burning a magic herb on your body (it’s a nice image) but in reality your body actually thinks its getting burned. In response to this “burn” the body rallies its defensive mechanism to the area where the moxa is being done as a kind of controlled micro trauma. As the moxa is placed on an acupuncture point related to a particular meridian- is close to an area where there is a vital organ or where there is a trauma- or has been a trauma** -then the qi and blood related to that organ is also liberated systemically and locally. This simple precise treatment  is actually doing a number of good things simultaneously. For a practitioner, is very good for keeping the hands and fingers strong, so we all benefit! Also, the effects of moxa last up to 6 months and in this sense, you certainly do get good “bang for your buck”. Because its done directly on the skin, the oils of the moxa are absorbed into the body . Even on children it’s very good. Recently I was told by a mother of two children here that since coming to my clinic they haven’t needed any antibiotics at all, and can shift colds and flu using their own defensive mechanism.

Various studies I have read reveal that moxa used directly this way makes new red and white blood cells, regulates liver function and blood sugar- reduces blood pressure and is anti carcinogenic (to name a few basic benefits- even the smoke from moxa is good!). With this in mind, we can see that it’s very beneficial for the immune defensive system as well as a general health maintenance treatment.

*GBH= Grievous Bodily Harm. This is a term that the police use for physical assault.Please don’t confuse a good acupuncture and moxa treatment!However, it makes interesting food for thought!

** I recently treated a patient who had an operation in the UK and his scar was healing badly. During surgery the bodies defensive mechanism is shut down which can make healing slow. One moxa treatment liberated a dormant healing response – the scar began to heal the following day. You can read more details in the post “Currently treating 2013”

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